Applied Ecology Clears Invasives – Plants 500+ Natives

A professional crew working on the steep slopes to the right and left of the entrance steps cleared a significant amount of ivy and blackberry. Applied Ecology led by Justin Howell worked September 23-26 all day. To the left of the steps the crew cleared a large area of ivy. To the right of the steps, in the picture, blackberries were removed. Restoration work will continue in October with conifer and shrub plantings on the slope in the picture. The crew will not plant ground cover just yet because there will be Himalayan blackberry regrowth. Blackberries will grow back, no matter how thoroughly the area is cleared. The regrowth can be managed with maintenance: 1) excavating the root crowns and large roots, 2) repeated removal of the aboveground vegetation and 3) densely planting native vegetation to shade the Himalayan blackberry because seedlings require exposure to high sunlight for survival. In my view, here is the best description of Himalayan blackberry (Rubus armeniacus)

UPDATE: Thursday, October 10, 2013, Applied Ecology is back to plant an estimated 500 shrubs and ground covers on the ivy-cleared slopes.

Applied Ecology Planting Juanita Heights Park slope

Applied Ecology Planting Juanita Heights Park slope

Applied Ecology plants 500 natives on ivy-cleared slope

Applied Ecology plants 500 natives on ivy-cleared slope

Hemp protects the slope from erosion until restoration continues with conifer and shrub plants.

Hemp protects the slope from erosion until restoration continues with conifer and shrub plants.

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2 Responses to Applied Ecology Clears Invasives – Plants 500+ Natives

  1. Jerry says:

    Will the ivy come back?

  2. Kathy Schuler says:

    Strands of ivy, here and there, will come back. Maintaining the area by periodically pulling out the vines that pop back will keep the ivy out so that ground cover and small shrubs can seed and take root. There is so much ivy in the urban forests and woodlands in the Seattle area that generations of stewards and volunteers will continually work to keep ivy out of the parks.

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